The cinnamomum cassia

The cinnamomum cassia tree grows natively in China, where the powdered bark has been used as an ingredient in natural medicine for gripe or colic for thousands of years. It is a close relative to cinnamon, with a sweeter aroma. Our cassia essential oil is steam-distilled from the leaves of the cassia tree.

Common Uses:
Cassia has a wonderful scent, and can be easily mixed with other spice essential oils. It is an extremely potent oil and when applied topically should be used in extreme dilution to avoid sensitivity. Diffuse in a blend or apply topically at a maximum of 0.2% dilution (one drop to 5 teaspoons carrier oil).



Aromatic Scent:
Cassia Essential Oil has a pungent, warm scent. Powdered cassia contains 1% to 2% volatile oil (cassia oil), which is mainly responsible for the spicy aroma.

History:
Also known as Bastard Cinnamon and Chinese Cinnamon, Cassia has been used medicinally in China for several thousand years. Its first recorded use dates back to the Han Dynasty (200 B.D.-A.D. 200)

Cautions:
Cassia Oil is a dermal irritant, dermal sensitizer and a mucus membrane irritant and should be avoided in pregnancy.



Cassia oil (CO) from different parts of Cinnamomum cassia have different active components. Very few pharmacological properties of cassia leaf oil have been reported. This study investigated and compared effects of cassia leaf oil and cinnamaldehyde on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated J774A.1 cells. Volatile compositions in cassia leaf oil were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. Effects of CO and cinnamaldehyde on LPS-activated J774A.1 cells were investigated by determining nitric oxide (NO) production using Griess reaction assay; expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, enzymes involve in inflammatory mediators; antiinflammatory cytokines, and iron exporter ferroportin1 (Fpn1) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction; and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-10 using ELISA. The main component of CO was cinnamaldehyde. Both oils at 1-20 μg/ml markedly inhibited NO production in LPS-activated J774A.1 cells with IC50 value of 6.1 ± 0.25 and 9.97 ± 0.35 μg/ml, respectively. They similarly inhibited mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These mediators included TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α in LPS-activated cells. They also significantly decreased expression of inducible enzymes inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin-E synthase-1. In the opposite way, they increased mRNA expression and the production of antiinflammatory cytokines IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β. In addition, they promoted the expression of Fpn1. These results demonstrated that inhibitory effects of cassia leaf oil from C. cassia mainly came from cinnamaldehyde. This compound not only inhibited inflammatory mediators but also activated antiinflammatory mediators in LPS-activated J774A.1 cells. It may also have an effect on iron regulatory proteins in activated macrophages.

Resembling Cinnamon Bark Essential Oil in aroma, Cassia Bark Essential Oil is sometimes used as an economical substitute within fragrancing applications.

It is my understanding that most of the "Ground Cinnamon" that we purchase in grocery stores, and even most of the "Cinnamon Sticks" that are sold are not true cinnamon, but are really its more affordable cousin, Cassia, Cinnamomum cassia.



Cassia Bark
When comparing the bark oils of both Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) and Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), I personally prefer the richer, fuller aroma of Cinnamon Oil to that of Cassia Oil.

Topically, both Cassia Bark and Cinnamon Bark oils should be used with extreme caution, if at all. Refer to the Safety Information section below for more information.

Pesan Anda